Tips and Products for Improving Safety at Your Facility

The safety of attendees and patrons is a primary concern for the management of all public assembly facilities.  Whether your venue is a large stadium, a mid-sized arena or theater, or a small college, high school or municipal sports stadium, it is of paramount importance to plan for safety and security and to communicate about this clearly with your customers.

Pre-planning and strategizing your messaging to attendees (via both signage and visual cues) are critical.  A good starting point would be taking a walking tour of your site.  Do this twice – once in an empty venue, and a second time when patrons are there while an event is going on.

Assess your facility’s current success in the following aspects:

  • Are you taking advantage of every possible opportunity to communicate with your attendees?
  • Can your attendees easily discern – visually – where lines (for tickets, concessions, etc.) begin and end?
  • Is it clear to patrons which areas of your facility they cannot access?  Is there signage telling them this?  Are there physical barriers to block them?
  • Does your facility have effective products to quickly and efficiently facilitate the movement of your patrons – in and out of the facility, and in lines within the facility?
  • Does your facility have the proper crowd management tools to maintain safety and keep patrons from experiencing or causing discomfort, injury or damage?

Particularly concentrate on your messaging and your crowd management products in these areas:

  • Entrances and exits
  • Ticket windows
  • Concession areas, souvenir stands, and merchandise stores
  • Work areas
  • No access zones
  • Parking lots

If your assessment leads you to conclude that your venue could benefit from additional crowd management and communications tools, here are some of the most popular, widely-used products which help to keep crowds safe and orderly and facilitate quick and efficient movement of your patrons.

Tensabarriers: Stadiums frequently employ this portable post and retractable belt line management system wherever their attendees line up, particularly at concession areas, souvenir stands, and in-facility stores.  Tensabarriers provide very unobtrusive, yet very effective, queue management.  They are also often used to control access to areas such as luxury boxes or VIP seating.

Crowd Control Barriers: Interlocking steel crowd control barricades are ubiquitous at the nation’s stadiums and arenas, from use on the field (during pre- and post-game events) to providing crowd and line control at entrances, ticket lines, food and souvenir stands, and parking lots.  They are also the most effective tool for blocking and/or surrounding no access zones.

Barrier Jackets: Wherever crowd control barricades are placed at your venue, custom-fit barrier covers can communicate a message.  In addition to promoting your brand, these jackets can also be used to convey information about policies, or provide patrons with directions from one part of your building to another.

Signage: Make sure your signs are colorful and attention getting.  They need to make a visual impression on your patrons.  Messages need to be as succinct – yet clear – as possible.  Consider placing messages – or warnings, when necessary – on existing structures such as railings.

Parking Lot products: Safety and clear messaging also needs to be considered in the place where many patrons will begin and end their journey to your venue – the parking lot.  Both barricades and posts with retractable belts can be used to block off selected areas.  Traffic cones can also be used to keep vehicles within safe pathways.

Safety and security are as important in small public facilities as they are in major sports stadiums.  All venues can benefit from a review of their crowd management products, policies, and communication strategies.  Experienced suppliers of crowd management products, such as the Tamis Corporation, can help you with your assessment and work to come up with solutions tailor-made for your site.

Author: Eric Mayhue

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